Bike maniac Tim Knoll

Bike maniac Tim Knoll

Here’s an unfortunately short bit of circus riding by Tim Knoll. You often see a lot of the same tricks in bike videos, so Knoll’s style mix of flatland, street, and circus riding is refreshing. I do get nervous when he stands on his handlebars or plays limbo with a row for semi-trucks. Be careful, Tim Knoll!

(thx, alex)

Tags: cycling   Tim Knoll   video

from kottke.org http://kottke.org/13/05/bike-maniac-tim-knoll

Social Roulette

Social Roulette

1 in 6 chance of deleting your Facebook account and all posts  

from Waxy.org Links http://socialroulette.net/

Animals by Christopher Meyer

Animals by Christopher Meyer

Animals, Moments of the Carters, Travis Latham and some other…  is a beautiful photomanipulated series by Christopher Meyer

(via trendhunter)

from why not? http://www.maricazottino.com/blog/?p=4726

New Work From JACE

New Work From JACE

Here are a few shots from JACE getting up in South Africa. We’re excited to have him be a part of our 10 year anniversary show coming up in August!

from Wooster Collective http://www.woostercollective.com/post/jace?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medi…

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang sculpture

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang sculpture

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang sculpture

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang sculpture

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang sculpture

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang sculpture

Human Faces Emerge from Splashes of Stainless Steel by Johnson Tsang sculpture

Hong Kong-based artist Johnson Tsang creates fascinating stainless steel sculptures containing the faces of people that seem to peer out from cascades of frozen liquid. If something seems familiar about these, it’s likely that you stumbled onto his 2002 ceramic work of kissing faces made of poured coffee that has been widely shared online. You can see dozens of the artists works over on Facebook—fair warning, some are exceptionally bizarre such as a human dinosaur, and a cup kissing a saucer. (via my modern met)

from Colossal http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2013/03/human-faces-emerge-from-splashes-of-sta…

On Feb. 26, Denmark’s TV2 needed an over-the-shoulder shot for a report on the conflict in…

On Feb. 26, Denmark’s TV2 needed an over-the-shoulder shot for a report on the conflict in…

On Feb. 26, Denmark’s TV2 needed an over-the-shoulder shot for a report on the conflict in Syria, and some production assistant gave the control room a screengrab from the original Assassin’s Creed (which features the city prominently) Apparently it’s this one, from the game’s unofficial wiki site. That’s supposed to be the city’s skyline as it appeared about 720 years ago, by the way.

Someone Put an Assassin’s Creed Screengrab In a TV Report on Syria – Kotaku (via Tom A)

For a piece on Amnesty and the United Nations Security Council’s response to events in Syria last week, it seems the BBC’s production crew needed a graphic for the international body. So they went to Google. And got…well, what they thought was the logo for the UN’s Security Council (which doesn’t really have one), but which in fact is the logo of the United Nations Space Command, humanity’s protectors in the Halo universe.

The BBC Might Have Confused Halo With the United Nations – Kotaku

from The New Aesthetic http://new-aesthetic.tumblr.com/post/45105056759/on-feb-26-denmarks-tv2-neede…

The science of addictive junk food

The science of addictive junk food

Michael Moss is a Pulitzer-winning investigative journalist for the NY Times and he’s written a book called Salt Sugar Fat.

From a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter at The New York Times comes the explosive story of the rise of the processed food industry and its link to the emerging obesity epidemic. Michael Moss reveals how companies use salt, sugar, and fat to addict us and, more important, how we can fight back.

Every year, the average American eats thirty-three pounds of cheese (triple what we ate in 1970) and seventy pounds of sugar (about twenty-two teaspoons a day). We ingest 8,500 milligrams of salt a day, double the recommended amount, and almost none of that comes from the shakers on our table. It comes from processed food. It’s no wonder, then, that one in three adults, and one in five kids, is clinically obese. It’s no wonder that twenty-six million Americans have diabetes, the processed food industry in the U.S. accounts for $1 trillion a year in sales, and the total economic cost of this health crisis is approaching $300 billion a year.

Moss researched the book for four years, interviewing hundreds of current and former processed-food industry employees and reviewing thousands of pages of industry memos. This weekend’s NY Times Magazine has a lengthy excerpt from the book that’s well worth a read.

Eventually, a line of the [Lunchables] trays, appropriately called Maxed Out, was released that had as many as nine grams of saturated fat, or nearly an entire day’s recommended maximum for kids, with up to two-thirds of the max for sodium and 13 teaspoons of sugar.

When I asked Geoffrey Bible, former C.E.O. of Philip Morris, about this shift toward more salt, sugar and fat in meals for kids, he smiled and noted that even in its earliest incarnation, Lunchables was held up for criticism. “One article said something like, ‘If you take Lunchables apart, the most healthy item in it is the napkin.’ “

Well, they did have a good bit of fat, I offered. “You bet,” he said. “Plus cookies.”

The prevailing attitude among the company’s food managers – through the 1990s, at least, before obesity became a more pressing concern – was one of supply and demand. “People could point to these things and say, ‘They’ve got too much sugar, they’ve got too much salt,’ ” Bible said. “Well, that’s what the consumer wants, and we’re not putting a gun to their head to eat it. That’s what they want. If we give them less, they’ll buy less, and the competitor will get our market. So you’re sort of trapped.” (Bible would later press Kraft to reconsider its reliance on salt, sugar and fat.)

And this is classic processed food as molecular gastronomy right here:

I brought him two shopping bags filled with a variety of chips to taste. He zeroed right in on the Cheetos. “This,” Witherly said, “is one of the most marvelously constructed foods on the planet, in terms of pure pleasure.” He ticked off a dozen attributes of the Cheetos that make the brain say more. But the one he focused on most was the puff’s uncanny ability to melt in the mouth. “It’s called vanishing caloric density,” Witherly said. “If something melts down quickly, your brain thinks that there’s no calories in it… you can just keep eating it forever.”

(via @bryce)

Tags: Michael Moss   food   science

from kottke.org http://kottke.org/13/02/the-science-of-addictive-junk-food

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